Talking Craft With MrMary: The Reality of Rejection Letter


One of the most important experiences of being a writer is rejection. I have gotten rejected recently from  some pretty good journals but  it wasn’t a flat out rejection. Take a look:

Rejection # 1

This is a popular and really good poetry magazine and it would be a dream for me to be published here.

Dear David,

Thank you for your submission!

We enjoyed the voice in your poems; in particular we enjoyed: Charleshowever, they are not what we are seeking for inclusion in [name hidden] We very much look forward to reading more from you in the future and encourage you to try us again.

Please feel free to submit again, we only ask that you wait at least three months before re-submitting.

Regards,

Editor in Chief

Rejection 2

This is a great publication, it is not as “high-ranking” as the one above but still a great  publication

We wanted to thank you for the opportunity to read your work. At this time we’re going to release the work for publication elsewhere. Best of luck to you and keep submitting!

You need to check the poem below for the line with two city names I think “start” needs to be plural. I liked the poem but not quite right – do try us again in the future.

Editor

Some Thoughts:

I think it takes a bit of time to get used to rejection letters.  After all when one is a writer one has to spend a lot of time honing one’s skills and  this happens usually in the ambiance of an action packed workday filled with a ton of responsibilities. I think rejection letter are important because they, for me at least, teach the writer/poet/story-teller:

  1. 1. How to become better at selecting the appropriate genre and niche for one’s writing. For me I have spent the last year working on making my verse technically sound and I can see the difference
  2. 2. How to write in such a way as to make your work accessible to others,
  3. 3 How to proofread and edit your own work, etc

My plan still is the same, it is to  publish in as many magazines ad publications as I can. (I have a targeted amount of publications in mind I would like to achieve. Then I will go on to create a chapbook or two and then finally hopefully then publish ad actual collection traditionally.

Every great writer or poet has had to deal with rejection. I felt that the sooner I was able to not take it so personally the sooner I was able to benefit from them and work to improve my craft

I just thought I would share

MrMary