Jocular Look @Today’s News: Secret audio of cops threatening teen under Stop and Frisk goes viral


Secret audio of cops threatening teen under Stop and Frisk goes viral

You thought New York’s Stop and Frisk policy couldn’t get any more controversial, and then you see this video. The footage obtained by The Nation news organization reveals a secret NSFW audio recording from 2011 of a Harlem teenager named Alvin being stopped by three police officers. As the video flashes random visuals and an interview with an anonymous NYPD cop, you can hear the heated audio. Officers can be heard calling Alvin a “f*cking mutt” and saying, “Dude, I’m gonna break your f*ckin’ arm, then I’m gonna punch you in the f*ckin’ face.” The 13-minute exposé, which The Nation claims is the only known audio of the Stop and Frisk policy in action, has instantly gone viral. [Source]

MrMary Weighs In

remember in high school telling a teacher that a cop was harassing me in the subway and I felt he was doing it because I was black. My teacher dismissed it, he said Cops aren’t bad people I was just making a big deal out of nothing.  I am not going to tell you about my youth or all those stories that Hollywood likes to tell about some emotionally cripple coloured person that make it out of the ‘hood’. Instead I am gonna tell you the truth:

  1. Cop wear black people the fuck out – when a cop approaches you  you don’t know if you will get a ticket, harassed, a beat-down, or thrown in jail. One time we were robbed as we slept and the robbers thought it would be funny to drink my apple juice, I had my name on it, an also leave knives one by each of our heads as we slept and a written note. My parents didn’t call the cops at all. No one did even if you were the victim.
  2. The government wears black people out even more if you can even imagine that.

Check out two headlines I posted today on my facebook:

Apps that protect you from police brutality

Hundreds of non-profit organisations have created mobile applications in the US meant to keep citizens safe from their local and federal governments. One group, Make the Road New York, has helped to develop a mobile app aimed at allowing users to record video and audio of instances of police brutality.

Did Army Spray Harmful Chemicals on US Cities?

During the 1950s and ’60s, the U.S. Army dusted chosen American cities from coast to coast with a fine powder of a fluorescent, potentially toxic chemical. And now one scientist says, at least in the case of St. Louis, that powder may have contained radioactive material. New research from sociologist Lisa Martino-Taylor in St. Louis, one of the cities singled out for heavy-duty testing during LAC, suggests the Army may have mixed radioactive particles with the zinc cadmium sulfide it spread throughout a poor, mostly black neighborhood there.

The Worse part

To be honest I am not mad about all abuse and random shit, like the Tuskegee experiment, and the litany of stuff I can go on about but don’t. What I am angered by are the people who say things to me like: its not that bad really that was  like in the past. Once things are past it basically never happened.  A quote from Howard Zinn  rings true I feel:

But the easy acceptance of atrocities as a deplorable but necessary price to pay for progress (Hiroshima and Vietnam, to save Western civilization; Kronstadt and Hungary, to save socialism; nuclear proliferation, to save us all)-that is still with us. One reason these atrocities are still with us is that we have learned to bury them in a mass of other facts, as radioactive wastes are buried in containers in the earth. We have learned to give them exactly the same proportion of attention that teachers and writers often give them in the most respectable of classrooms and textbooks. This learned sense of moral proportion, coming from the apparent objectivity of the scholar, is accepted more easily than when it comes from politicians at press conferences. It is therefore more deadly.

But the easy acceptance of atrocities as a deplorable but necessary price to pay for progress (Hiroshima and Vietnam, to save Western civilization; Kronstadt and Hungary, to save socialism; nuclear proliferation, to save us 

all)-that is still with us. One reason these atrocities are still with us is that we have learned to bury them in a mass of other facts, as radioactive wastes are buried in containers in the earth. We have learned to give them exactly the same proportion of attention that teachers and writers often give them in the most respectable of classrooms and textbooks. This learned sense of moral proportion, coming from the apparent objectivity of the scholar, is accepted more easily than when it comes from politicians at press conferences. It is therefore more deadly.

4 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s